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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)
or six years. i feel like things change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think academia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con g
which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50s arm every day. -- 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. the king collect information. -- they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. a convicted on facebook. -- you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. publicly it will be here next year. read it carefully, it will be here next year. read it carefully, it will be here next year. -- hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program a
can't have the boom and the bust. thenwhere it went big and then it was destroyed and then technology jobs went overseas. it's difficult to think about that and the repercussion when we could have a much more orderly transfer. but not the boom and bust. >> gavin: assume that president obama is re-elected. what should he think about going into the new year, taking the baton of sandy and new consciousness that hopefully is iowaawakened. what should be the top priority going into the second term? >> the top priority is talking again. your point was i think it was a good one that you started out with, no one is talking about. neither candidate is talking about it. we can't expect the american public to get on board if the leaders aren't talking about this. one thing that everyone is clear on, we will have storms of more intensity because of global warming. we will have more storms like this in the future because of global warming. one thing we have to do is start talking about it. second we really double down on theonthe innovation agenda. the president did a good job speaking about the s
and engage with the latest web and mobile technologies and they bring in entrepreneurers as guest speakers and share the work they're doing in our communities today and their career path and how technology influenced their lives so to spark america and the martinez brothers and others we thank you for your service. [applause] >> the next awardees will be recognized for their contributions in the field of business. to make this presentation we would like to invite to the stage the honorable from mexico mr. corona . [applause] >> jenny florez is the director -- i'm sorry. would you join us at the stage. [applause] jenny is a community development director of city northern california. she is responsible for the community development, investment in the community -- community redevelopment act program and making sure that under served communities in the marketplace have access to financial services and products. prior to her position with citi she served with the congress of california seniors a state wide nonprofit organization dedicated to assisting low income families on the issues of hea
. california the center of technological innovation. how did it happen? there is a spirit there about the open mind, about learning. you take a country like south korea, that in the early 60s had a g.d.p. the same as most african countries and today is first world. >> gavin: what is foundation what is the most exciting that you're working on? what is are you passionate about. >> the most difficult, and most exciting for me, i have two foundations. one in africa where we work along side the governments of africa to deliver change to the people in seven different african countries. called the big footprint and then an organization of religious and cultural exchange where we work in some of the most difficult countries in the world where people are educated in the way they think and look at each other. >> gavin: you're not just bringing in resources you're using your own human resource to get involved, hands on, i imagine. >> i raise money for my foundation. i gave my own money to them and i go out to 20 different countries. it's a political after life. not for you governor, yet at any rate. >> g
much" series. watch on c-span2. >> now a conference from detroit focusing on technology and entrepreneurship in u.s. urban areas throughout the country. it was a conference in mid september at wayne state university. this part of the conference's two hours. >> i'm going to turn it over to you. >> rock on. >> thank you for getting us started and thank you for being here. it is exciting to finally have this thing under way. we have been working on it for an awfully long time. what we do is up to now, a retreat-like invitation only leaders thing in the desert and we really wanted to get our message out in the broader community, particularly in the united states where we think there are some messages that are not sufficiently understood. i hope that is what you will be hearing throughout the day today. the messages at this event are focused on four issues -- u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth, which is tied to the first to, and the revival of our cities with detroit as a case study #one. we're very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great ci
years and years of technology -- liz: well traders were e-mailing me and said i'm upset, i wanted to go to work, i can handle this. >> it is one thing to be physically on the floor. the question is for a small investor and these markets are for the public too, by the way. the average investor that buys and sells stocks. you know, needs access to the markets. it makes no sense. this does not make sense. liz: on any other day you would never see what i'm about to show you and that is a shot of the big board at zero at 3:28 p.m. >> here's the thing, the big board's electronic station is located in chicago. liz: i know. >> its data system is in new jersey. the nasdaq has its system that's not -- i don't even know. i think it is in bethesda to be honest with you. liz: are you saying this is political? >> i don't know what it is. somebody screwed up here and this is a big thing. bond market is an over-the-counter market, maybe they are just -- who knows how it is not trading. i'm just telling you this that someone has to answer why the technology that -- why the brokers backed off on this, an
in technology because the agency's technology is really any pretty dismal state. the agency never has before people think that's great you don't need so many people because you're using technology. maxtor is for my entire career's technology allows you to work smarter and better and more efficiently, but it actually doesn't diminish the need for people because you find so many more things on your technology he to do market surveillance, to look for insider trading and market manipulation and analyze our mbs and how they've been structured and see what the flaws are. so while we put a big heavy emphasis on technology investment could we also need to invest in our people and we been able to grow a little bit in the last couple of years, not enough, but a little bit. i can't really give you a number. i will say that we are at agents to just under 4000 people, with extraordinary broad responsibility. everything from accounting standard-setting oversight to money market funds and mutual funds, to market berkshire. we all read every day about market structure issues come into broker-dealers and ho
in the world. we're blessed with terrific soldiers and extraordinary technology and intelligence. but the idea of a trillion dollars in cuts through sequestration and budget cuts to the military would change that. we need to have strong allies. our association and -- and connection with our allies is essential to america's strength. we're the -- the great nation that has allies, 42 allies and friends around the world. and finally, we have to stand by our principles. and if we're strong in each of those things, american influence will grow. but unfortunately, in nowhere in the world is america's influence greater today than it was four years ago. >> all right. >> and that's because we've become weaker on each of those four dimensions. >> all right -- perfect. you're going to get a chance to respond to that because that's a perfect segue into our next segment, and that is what is america's role in the world. and that is the question. what do each of you see as our role in the world? and i believe, governor romney, it's your turn to go first. >> well, i -- i absolutely believe that america has a
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change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think macadamia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con goes to talk to a kid. i sometim
of that strategic planning will require getting out and staying out in front of the information technology revolution which has been among the most significant drivers of educational change in the last 15 to 20 years. it has also been like a runaway train. one response to the higher education funding crisis has been increased appeals especially from legislators and business leaders for higher education to drastically increase online education. the hope is that more students will receive college degrees after at less cost and research shows that done appropriately application of technologies can both improve learning outcomes and decrease costs of delivering that education but so far savings have proven imus sieve. nonetheless, massive open online courses are testing the market. dozens of universities including mit, harvard, princeton and stanford offer these classes from the headlines like college might never be the same. stay tuned, could be a wild ride. good ideas take time and research to explore. penn state operates a world campus with 12,000 students enrolled and dozens of full online
transactions to a different, a different entity, a different central clearing entity. well, the technology of that is not really well understood at all, and it's hard to have confidence in that. but moreover, it's not clear that without some kind of government sponsorship or government backing or access the liquidity a central clearing facility will have the confidence to avoid, essentially, what would be a run. and while dodd-frank actually provides for some support to central clearing entities -- which, by the way, seems to go mostly unnoticed by critics who say, you know, we've eliminated government support, we've eliminated taxpayer support, we've eliminated the possibility of too big to fail -- we do have a provision that permits intervention to help in a modest way financial, financial utilities like central clearing facilities. however, that's not universal. there's no provision made in europe to support whether directly or indirectly any central clearing facility. so in my mind we've created a series of risks within the derivatives area that were nonexistent before we began this en
in medical breakthroughs or new technology. we think america is stronger when we can count on affordable health care and medicare and social security. , where there are rules to protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury poisoning. we think the market works better when consumers are protected from unscrupulous practices in the credit-card industry or from mortgage lenders and we believe that no politician in washington should control health care choices that women can make for themselves. [applause] for 80 years, we had a president who shared our beliefs and his name was bill clinton. [applause] his economic plan passed the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we could reduce our deficit and invest in our future. at the time, the republican congress and a senate candidate by the name of mitt romney said this would hurt the economy and kill jobs. it turns out that his judgment was just as bad back then as it is today. [applause] by the end of president clinton + second term, america created 23 million new jobs and incomes were up in poverty was down and we had the biggest sur
that we see and how much of it is what is ta ted about it as structural issues, changing technology,ed globalization, a kind of new normal that we've heard about from many pple? >> well -- >> i think-- hold on, let me go withpustan goolsbee here first. >> okay. >> okay, so two parts of the how much of the unemployment rate is coming from structural, i think not that high. i do think that is the thing that the economy is going to have to do. the fundamental reason why this recession loo a lot a like the 2001 recovery and not the 1983 recovery is we can't go back to doing what we were doing before the recession began. just as in 2001 a bubble popped and then you're trying to shift what the economy is doing. so there is some element of that. but we also have b got a significant component as i saof the whole world has slowed down. the u.s. growth rate while not fast enough is faster than the rest of the advanced world. so we've got to find a way to get ourselves boosted up where we're not getting any support from being leng to increase our exports to other countries when that is exactly th
but also information technology improvements that have made things possible that were not available in the past. but a lot of these programs are under pressure now. some of it is so explicit political attacks aimed at outreach programs and aimed at the policies that have made it easier for people and on the programs. we also know the state agencies are stretched very thin. there are a lot of demands on them and their funding has been caught and in some we're hearing stories of unemployment insurance and people calling and calling to apply for their benefits and just getting a busy signal over and over again. it is a real opportunity to think about how we can build on the progress we've made so far. how can we prevent it from wearing away and what improvements can we make in the future. in particular, the affordable care act or the health care reform presents an opportunity to make some improvements as we move forward. i am going to wave to reports also available outside of the coalition. one is specifically how the human service programs and their clients can benefit from health car
before you switch. visit progressive.com today. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> wikileaks claims it has released more than 100 classified or otherwise restricted files from the united states department of defense that relate to u.s. military policies relating to detainees. they say they'll continue to release more documents over the coming month. one man who made international headlines after he was accused of leaking to the group is bradley manning. his trial will not begin until next february, but over his last two years in prison, there are some who have tried to draw up support on manning's behalf and that include a music legend
thought that technology was bringing that about. that it was actually producing such increases in wealth that we would be able to have abundance with a fraction of the work. that people would then do it. but that bit of it hasn't come about. >> why? >> i think a number of explanations. one is that our society's become much more unequal than it was when canes was writing. the other is i think he underestimated the force of insatiability. the relative character -- >> you end up with new needs and new wants. if you have one car, you feel like maybe it will be even more fun to have three. in the book it seems to me -- correct me if i'm wrong -- briefly what you're saying is you need enough for a good what we would consider good or upper middle class in terms of material comforts, house, things like that. beyond that, the kind of constant accumulation of more stuff doesn't give you a good life. what gives you a good life is time spent with your family, building relationships, pursuing activities that you find interesting. >> yeah. well, we break it down into seven basic goods, as we call that
across the country. it involves technology, investment in technology. i believe it starts in grades k- 12. talk about jobs between -- for people in their 20s and 30s. if we do not try to be more advanced, we will not be competitive in the global market. >> the middle class here is facing the same problem the middle-class is facing everywhere in the country. our government has not been able to work together because of being controlled by major lobby groups that are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax return -- tax reform that makes sense that accumulates revenue and is equitably history. we need to make sure we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the waste and mismanagement and misallocation of resources we see throughout government as is evidenced in benghazi. we need to address that. we can address that by having more independents there to let the people know there is someone else available to take their place. >> let's move onto the next question right now. go ahead. really quick. >> i campaign all over the state. i meet with people every d
first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i just wanted to say something about the book that made me think, but here in texas, looking at its history, particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas among regular people because as the land was given away the mexican government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and his half-brother and almost looked like the same person, you
on technology. this is kind of scary what we are basing it all on tonight. >> they may yet be right. in the case of the chicago newspaper, there were wrong. it still could be right, but they pulled back. >> in fairness to al gore making his concession phone call, he was probably listening to us. needed to win. is because if this state remainsyou will not know who carries the state of florida. it could go longer than that. host: that news clip points out a couple of things. first, the exit polling. all of the networks using andwe seem to get caught up in believing the exit polls, and they are not always accurate. guest: the exit polls were not being used to call the election in florida. the election was so close that be used because they had organization that actually executes the exit poll was using actual election results. they were basing their forecast models out of how much was left to be counted in florida. but we have seen in past patterns of of voting. one county misreported. suddenly, all of these a very narrow models were saying, we are in recount, we will not be able to call the electi
." when it happened to us, it was based on technology. this is kind of scary what we are basing it all on tonight. >> they may yet be right. in the case of the chicago newspaper, there were wrong. it still could be right, but they pulled back. >> in fairness to al gore making his concession phone call, he was probably listening to us. >> no doubt about it. it is 260 al gore, with 270 needed to win. florida's electoral votes. the reason florida is in white is because if this state remains undecided as of this hour, a recount has been ordered. you will not know who carries the state of florida. it could go longer than that. host: that news clip points out a couple of things. first, the exit polling. all of the networks using and sharing the same information. we seem to get caught up in believing the exit polls, and they are not always accurate. guest: the exit polls were not being used to call the election in florida. the election was so close that the polls themselves could not be used because they had statistical errors in them. instead, the networks and the organization that actually
and new technologies that are coming on line as we involved our energy exploration efforts. here in colorado we have what is similar to the balkan information. all down the front range as were the niobrara a formation is. i think god will -- i think that will motivate some orders to turn out. -- i think that will motivate some voters to turn out. you'll still see a gravitation with the folks in the suburbs where there are high-paying jobs. host: one of the many aspects colorado is see in, it is playing in that state as well as other battle ground states is from the body -- the obama campaign. [video clip] >> pluribus to close to call. >> the difference between what was and what could have been. this year, if you are thinking that your vote doesn't count, that it won't matter, back then, there were probably at least 537 people that felt the same way. make your voice heard. vote. host: is that having an impact? guest: you know, it is a great advertisement. it is driving right to the heart of what president obama needs to throw colorado, but also the about brown states. it is to get
. but these cars and oil burning equipment. they should be made more efficient. you cannot use the technology that you are using 100 years ago. and have oral burning equipment -- lyders said one oil was $5 a gallon. -- like i said. host: what about nuclear power? some critics believe it is dangerous, others believe that could replace fossil fuels. caller: 13 of nuclear plants 50 miles from where i live at. -- there are two nuclear plants. coal is hazardous to your help. unless they come up with a way to burn it cleaner. it is just dirty. host: here is the new york times and nuclear power. excuse me, the wall street journal. reactors at three of the points remained at of service tuesday. a plant in new jersey lost grid electricity forcing it to rely on a backup generator. the reactor, the oldest still operating in the united states, already was shut down for refueling. they said 36 of the 43 sirens intended to alert a nearby communities at the plants were not working. that is what happened at the nuclear power plants because of this storm. early snow pummels west regina, story. the superstorm
i think with modern technology, we know about these hurricanes, four or five, six, seven days in advance, right. so there'shisbuild up, this anticipatory anxiety. it's coming in six days, five days, four days. and you get to emergency mode. now in evolution, emergency mode is a great thing. your cortisol goes up, your adrenaline goes up. if there's a tiger there a million years ago off you go and you run away and you either live or you die, right. but that whole emergency mode lasts a couple minutes. we are not used to being in emergency mode for four, five, six days. when that happens, it just don't feel good. pit of the stomach, anxiety. >> rose: what can you do about that. >> there are three things is to create panic. one of them is danger. people sense danger. two is a feeling of being trapped. and i know i had a friend of mine that day of the hurricane hit when she said boy she was okay until she heard that the subways were closed. she got a feeling in the pit of her stomach and she popped a pill to relax you and she just felt anxious. and the third thing is bad informat
technologies and the shift in the relative value of intangible assets versus tangible assets. >> isn't the big difference the health care point you were bringing up? >> you're right. >> i work in tr. mine is kind of a propronged step out. my apologies. first one is in terms of the access to financial markets and what that has to do with america. i see those [inaudible] talked about the savings rates. these are potential access to the markets. how would you say -- financial -- all those different that didn't cause crash that are actually useful in terms of creating assets for the market. and then the disparity between income inequality and what raising families has to do with that. women freakly eentor the workforce and you're talking about the history of the nites. in terms of parttime work. or in terms of house work versus bread winner or stuff like that. >> well, on the question of women's earnings, yes. the fact that women are the primary care takers of children in our society as compared to their husbands and a lot of women with children don't have husbands. it's certainly a factor absolut
it -- it was a hunch. when it happened to us, it was based on technology. it is kind of scary what we are basing this on tonight. >> they may yet be right to enter the case of the chicago tribune, and they were wrong but. it still could be right. they pulled a back. >> a denture fairness to our core, he was probably listening to us. >> he and his people. no doubt about it. florida's electoral votes, look at the map. the reason florida is and why it is because this state remains undecided as of this hour. a recount has been ordered. we will not know who carries the state of florida. it is completely and decisive for a number of hours. >> you remember so well what happened 12 years ago. it did go to the supreme court. one of the closest elections with al gore winning the popular vote and george bush won in the electoral college vote. what if that happens again in 2012? caller: i am just glad the question -- most of the calls the, and. host: joining us from pine bluff, arkansas. is -- what happens next if there is an election dispute? caller: they have to be sure they are ready for recounting. here
for us, each of them in uniform have the equipment and technology they need to be able to do their job. that is what we would ensure with mitt romney because he is not going to cut our military. [applause] the president has promised he will raise taxes. he just said that. he said he wants to raise it on millions of small businesses. the experts have said that will result in about 700,000 jobs being lost. jobs we cannot afford to lose. mitt romney has an alternative, which makes a lot of sense. he has said let's do tax reform, simplified the tax code and create more jobs. he did what ronald reagan did. the experts have looked at that and they have said that will create 7 million new jobs. let's talk about this as a choice. 700,000 lost or 7 million gain. which one is better? obama or romney? romney, of course. this is the choice that our fellow citizens are going to make, we are all going to make. sure people know the facts. i believe we have the enthusiasm on our side. i believe if we do our part, we will begin to turn things around. god bless you for what you are doing and for what sh
to rely on technology. we need to be strategic in how we go about -- >> a smaller military then we have now? >> it might be a different military. it might be smaller, but the most important thing for us is to make sure we have a strong economy in the world. that means making sure that we actually get something done and congress can get the economy back on track. i think we need to be able to react very quickly situations around the world, because many of them are much smaller. what we have done in the past, and congressman king is responsible for this, we have been involved in two wars that have taken a huge toll in human life and money as well. our debt is $6 trillion when he went in -- it is $16 trillion now. we put to wars on the credit card. we have to make sure that before we go into conflict, we are prepared to do that. >> let's ask about what you just said -- you can reply to that. then, if you explain your measurement of u.s. power in the world. >> i have been accused of starting two wars. [laughter] >> not paying for them. >> i did not restart those wars. that has been repeated
. they were not going to chase good money after bad. they thought technology would lose. now they're back after seeing some of those polls. we have seen millions within the last week alone. there is only so much television time. we're going right down to the stretch. host: what are you hearing from voters? isn't making an impact? caller: i think they do in some way. there would not be spending all this money if they were not. at some point they just become one ad after another. it becomes a rapid fire. someone may think what is going on here? the message is not getting through. they have a tendency to focus and on things the candidates want them to focus on? they do get a message out there. by tuesday voters are tired of it. they're starting to make their mind up. these are going to get more intense. it is going to prove to be the deciding factor. you can read his , here now we will go to a debate between those two candidates running for the senate seat in missouri. this comes to us courtesy of st. louis. the debate is from october 18. it features such her career mc caskill and todd akin.
20 miles of subway tunnels? you have the technology! please. >>> welcome to "cbs morning news." i'm charlie o'donnell. norah o'donnell is in washington. >>> the storm is now blamed for at least 92 deaths in the united states. >> some 3.8 million utility customers in 13 states are still without electricity. most of them in new york and new jersey. a new estimate shows sandy will cost $50 million in damage to the economy. that makes it the second most expensive storm in history after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's deaths happened on staten island. secretary of state janet napolitano will be there today. anna werner is there. >> reporter: good morning. homes are destroyed. the storm threw cars like toys. that's what it looks like all down this street yet many residents say they believe they've been ignored. some residents of staten island have started calling it the forgotten borough. across storm-ravaged staten island, frustrations are mounting. >> we could have died! we couldn't breathe! we've got 90-year-old people. >> reporter: residents are outraged, claimi
not want to come here anymore, we need more help on the border. we need to use technology more so we can move trucks and people back and forth. it is a federal opportunity. the border is a federal responsibility. we cannot go along the in this piecemeal, and a fashion with a broken immigration program and not have comprehensive reform. comprehensive reform is about economics, making the border more secure, it is about facilitating the goods and people on a regular basis so they can work here and go home. we all profit from that. the federal government has an important role. >> we have gratefully better infrastructure over the past couple of years. we are having trouble getting appropriate staffing for the ports. that has been stressful for those of us and congress. we have not been able to get a staffing model to tell us how much money we need to authorize and appropriate for the sports. in the last go around, i passed an amendment in the house to dock the secretary's office a token amount to come up with a staffing model because we have been begging them to tell us what we need to appro
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)